Happening December 9th at the MPIPZ

2019 MPIPZ Alumni Career Day

Happening December 9th at the MPIPZ [more]

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CEPLAS

Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research

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The primary scientific goal of the Department of Plant Developmental Biology is to study molecular mechanisms that regulate the responsiveness of plant development to environmental cues. In particular, a strong emphasis is placed on understanding the mechanisms controlling the transition to flowering in response to environmental signals and in explaining the diversity in flowering responses observed between species.

Department of Plant Developmental Biology (Director: George Coupland)

The primary scientific goal of the Department of Plant Developmental Biology is to study molecular mechanisms that regulate the responsiveness of plant development to environmental cues. In particular, a strong emphasis is placed on understanding the mechanisms controlling the transition to flowering in response to environmental signals and in explaining the diversity in flowering responses observed between species.

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Research in the Department of Plant Microbe Interactions engages in fundamental molecular processes underlying interactions between plants and pathogenic or beneficial microorganisms. The plant innate immune system, mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and principles determining the assembly and functions of beneficial plant-associated microbial communities have a central role in our discovery programme.

Department of Plant Microbe Interactions (Director: Paul Schulze-Lefert)

Research in the Department of Plant Microbe Interactions engages in fundamental molecular processes underlying interactions between plants and pathogenic or beneficial microorganisms. The plant innate immune system, mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and principles determining the assembly and functions of beneficial plant-associated microbial communities have a central role in our discovery programme.

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Research in the Department of Comparative Development and Genetics aims to attain a predictive understanding of how biological forms develop and diversify, by using a combination of genetics, biological imaging, genomics and computational modelling. To empower their work scientists in the Department developed Cardamine hirsuta- a small crucifer related to the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana- into a powerful genetic system. Comparative studies between these two species and other seed plants aids them in uncovering the mechanistic basis for plant diversity and helps them formulate general hypotheses about how morphology evolves.

Department of Comparative Development and Genetics (Director: Miltos Tsiantis)

Research in the Department of Comparative Development and Genetics aims to attain a predictive understanding of how biological forms develop and diversify, by using a combination of genetics, biological imaging, genomics and computational modelling. To empower their work scientists in the Department developed Cardamine hirsuta- a small crucifer related to the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana- into a powerful genetic system. Comparative studies between these two species and other seed plants aids them in uncovering the mechanistic basis for plant diversity and helps them formulate general hypotheses about how morphology evolves.

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Meiosis is a specialized cell division and an essential stage in the life cycle of sexually-reproducing organisms, during which genetic information is shuffled. The department aims to decipher the molecular mechanisms of recombination, cell cycle control and chromosome distribution at meiosis, using complementary plant models.

Department of Chromosome Biology (Director: Raphael Mercier)

Meiosis is a specialized cell division and an essential stage in the life cycle of sexually-reproducing organisms, during which genetic information is shuffled. The department aims to decipher the molecular mechanisms of recombination, cell cycle control and chromosome distribution at meiosis, using complementary plant models. [more]
The groups directed by these scientists operate outside the departmental structure and can pursue their own research topics for a period of up to five years. Service groups are also independent of the departments and are headed by tenured scientists who perform research tasks, in addition to service duties.

Independent Research Groups

The groups directed by these scientists operate outside the departmental structure and can pursue their own research topics for a period of up to five years. Service groups are also independent of the departments and are headed by tenured scientists who perform research tasks, in addition to service duties.



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